Foundations 20182019-03-01T12:08:39+00:00

Foundations

The tireless work of the foundations listed in this category play an important role in strengthening and empowering the veteran community. These foundations provide direct support to the community through the development of employment initiatives, by providing funding for research on veteran-specific health issues, and by bringing relevant dialogue and educational opportunities to the general public in order to increase the overall understanding of veterans and the military community. These foundations’ efforts have worked to bring a number of benefits to veterans, and their commitment to these efforts has increased the overall strength of the veteran and supporter community.

May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust

The May & Stanley Smith Charitable Trust aims to strengthen programs and services that support veterans, service members, and their families in the transition to successful new lives and careers after leaving the military. Community organizations are essential components in a collaborative, holistic approach designed to achieve veteran and family well-being, self-sufficiency, and community integration.

By providing grants to deserving organizations and individuals, The May & Stanley Smith Charitable Trust addresses four strategies which collectively support veterans and their families to realize economic self-sufficiency and a good quality of life: Mental and Behavioral Health and Wellness; Education, Training, and Employment; Housing Stability; and Community Integration.

Craig Newmark, Craig Newmark Philanthropies

Craig Newmark is a Web pioneer, philanthropist, speaker, and one of America’s most recognized nerds. In 1995 he founded craigslist, which to date has seen more than 5 billion classified ads posted. In 2012 he was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame. In 2016, he created the Craig Newmark Philanthropies, a private foundation to promote philanthropy and civic engagement. He was born in Morristown, New Jersey and received degrees in computer science from Case Western Reserve University. He now lives in San Francisco. Craig Newmark Philanthropies focuses on a number of issues, to include Veteran and Military Families, women in technology, voter protection, and trustworthy journalism.

@Craig_Newmark

Bob Forrester, Newman’s Own Foundation

Robert H. (Bob) Forrester is President and CEO of Newman’s Own Foundation, Chairman and CEO of Newman’s Own, Inc, and U.S. Army Captain who served in Vietnam. He was a close, personal friend and philanthropic advisor to actor Paul Newman, who founded the company and foundation. As President and CEO of Newman’s Own Foundation, Forrester has overseen the philanthropic giving to over 20 different non-profits that focus on Veterans and their families.

Prior to Newman’s Own, Forrester was the founder, chairman, and CEO of Payne, Forrester & Associates, LLC, an international consulting group providing services to nonprofits. He also has served in senior management positions at the University of Hartford and New York University. Over the course of his career, he has spent 43 years working with nonprofit and philanthropic organizations in the U.S., Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. He also serves on numerous boards.

@NewmansOwnFdn

The Heinz Endowments

The Heinz Endowments focuses much of its charitable giving on Post 9-11 Veterans by working to connect veterans with opportunities to lead and serve in our community. The Heinz family is committed to making systems that care for veterans and military family members transparent and accountable, where the health and wellness of veterans supersede the needs of any organization or individual. They work to refocus shallow stereotypes of veterans as broken or in need by highlighting their formidable talents. The Heinz Endowments partner with organizations that challenge them in positive ways.

The Heinz Endowment focuses primarily but not exclusively on post 9/11 veterans to increase the amount of proactive and preventive resources available. The Pew Research Center’s October 2011 report, “War and Sacrifice in the Post-9/11 Era,” identified 44 percent of the post-9/11 veteran population as “at risk” as they leave the military. But this confirms that 56 percent of returning veterans reintegrate into civilian life seamlessly. Also contrary to popular perception, the overwhelming majority of the 44 percent identified as “at risk” do not struggle with significant mental health, physical health, or housing crises. Rather they are struggling, in large part, because of this faulty perception. This results in an inability to penetrate closed social networks, a misunderstanding of how their well-earned skill sets can be leveraged by employers, and a desire to serve without valued and vetted opportunities to do so.

@heinzendow

Sheri Schultz, Schultz Family Foundation

Sheri Kersch Schultz is president of the Schultz Family Foundation, which she co-founded in 1996 with her husband, Howard Schultz, chairman emeritus of Starbucks Coffee Company. Guided by a belief that the right opportunities at the right time can unleash human potential—and that “inequality of opportunity” is stifling America’s own potential, the Foundation invests in innovative solutions and collaborative partnerships that create new pathways to opportunity so disconnected populations can overcome barriers to success.

@SchultzFamilyFd

National Archive Foundation, Remembering Vietnam Initiative

The Vietnam War impacted attitudes, policies, and the way Americans view their government and their nation’s place in the world. It altered the way the government conducts war and interacts with the media. And yet, more than 50 years since the U.S. committed combat troops to the war in Vietnam, critical questions still remain in the public’s mind about how and why the U.S. became involved.

Following the trajectory of American involvement in Vietnam from its World War II origins to the fall of Saigon in 1975, the National Archives exhibit Remembering Vietnam, explores the policies and decisions that initiated and escalated American economic and military aid to South Vietnam—during the French Indochina War and then in what Americans call the Vietnam War.

@archivesfdn